Sickle cell ‘Schools Guide’ Igbo translation

Igbo Translation

Home / Search for OER

Igbo Translation

Content Author:
Professor Simon Dyson

Level:
Healthcare professionals, school professionals, policy makers

OER Features:
Schools Guide translation into Nigerian English
Word Document – SCOOTER90a_School_Policy_Igbo

PDF File – SCOOTER90b_School_Policy_Igbo

OER Description:

This version of the popular ‘Guide to School Policy‘ has been translated into Yoruba to benefit wider groups of teachers and policy makers supporting school children with sickle cell anaemia and thalassaemia. The following people were involved in this new version of the school policy guide, and we would like to thank them for their contribution:

• Bola Ojo,
• Naomi Maiguwa, • Jonah Lah
• Dr Baba Inusa
• Comfort Okol
• Elizabeth Anionwu

Ọ ga-amasị anyị ịkele ndị a maka ịmepụta amụma ntụziaka nke ụlọ akwụkwọ nke ụdị Naịjirịa:

• Bola Ojo,
• Naomi Maiguwa,
• Jonah Lah
• Dr Baba Inusa
• Comfort Okolo
• Elizabeth Anionwu

We would like to thank the following for their critical appraisal of the original UK draft of this policy guide:

• Professor Elizabeth Anionwu, CBE, Emeritus Professor of Nursing, University of West London. • Suzi Crawford, Specialist Nurse Counsellor, Soho Health Centre, Birmingham.
• Dr Paul Telfer, Senior Lecturer in Haematology at Queen Mary, University of London , and Honorary Consultant Haematologist at St Bartholomew’s and The Royal London NHS Trusts.

Sickle cell ‘Schools Guide’ Yoruba translation

Yoruba Translation

Home / Search for OER

Yoruba Translation

Content Author:
Professor Simon Dyson

Level:
Healthcare professionals, school professionals, policy makers

OER Features:
Schools Guide translation into Nigerian English
Word Document – SCOOTER89a_School_Policy_Yoruba

PDF File – SCOOTER89b_School_Policy_Yoruba

OER Description:

This version of the popular ‘Guide to School Policy‘ has been translated into Yoruba to benefit wider groups of teachers and policy makers supporting school children with sickle cell anaemia and thalassaemia. The following people were involved in this new version of the school policy guide, and we would like to thank them for their contribution:

• Bola Ojo,
• Naomi Maiguwa, • Jonah Lah
• Dr Baba Inusa
• Comfort Okolo
• Elizabeth Anionwu

A ó dúpẹ́ lọ́wọ àwọn wọ̀nyii fún ṣiṣé ìmúgbòòrò ìtọ́ni sí àkóso ìlànà ẹ̀kọ́ ẹ̀yà ti Nàìjírìa:

  • Bola Ojo,
  • Naomi Maiguwa,
  • Jonah Lah
  • Dr Baba Inusa
  • Comfort Okolo
  • Elizabeth Anionwu

We would like to thank the following for their critical appraisal of the original UK draft of this policy guide:

• Professor Elizabeth Anionwu, CBE, Emeritus Professor of Nursing, University of West London. • Suzi Crawford, Specialist Nurse Counsellor, Soho Health Centre, Birmingham.
• Dr Paul Telfer, Senior Lecturer in Haematology at Queen Mary, University of London , and Honorary Consultant Haematologist at St Bartholomew’s and The Royal London NHS Trusts.

Guide for schools to help learners with sickle cell

Guide for schools

Guide for schools

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image: School Health and Safety Guide by Professor Simon Dyson
Creative Commons BY-SA

Author:
Professor Simon Dyson

Level:
Undergraduate social sciences and healthcare, postgraduate, education and healthcare professionals.

OER Features:

Funding report: Education of young people with sickle cell disease
http://sicklecellanaemia.org/resources/resources/scooter24-29/scooter24.html

Editable guide for schools
http://sicklecellanaemia.org/resources/resources/scooter24-29/scooter25.html 

OER Description:

These open educational resources are perhaps some of our most important. They are the result of a research project funded by the UK Economic & Social Research Council and conducted between De Montfort University, University of York and Loughborough University. The first report provides some essential background information to sickle cell disease, which is a complex condition with symptoms ranging from stroke, silent stroke, chronic pain and acute painful crises.

This research project explored how young people are treated in schools, and as a result, a help guide has been produced which many schools are now using and have adapted to provide support and better care of sickle suffers in their education setting.

Lecture series – educational experiences of young people with sickle cell

Research by S Dyson

Image: Sickle cell and educational experience by Professor Simon Dyson
Creative Commons BY-SA.

Author:
Professor Simon Dyson

Level:
Undergraduate social sciences and healthcare, postgraduate, education and healthcare professionals.

OER Features:

Narrated presentation: Literature review of the educational experiences of young people with sickle cell.
http://sicklecellanaemia.org/resources/resources/scooter30-35/scooter30.html

Narrated presentation: Local authorities and the education of young people with sickle cell.
http://sicklecellanaemia.org/resources/resources/scooter30-35/scooter31.html

Reported experiences of young people with sickle cell.
http://sicklecellanaemia.org/resources/resources/scooter30-35/scooter32.html

Disclosure and young people with sickle cell.
http://sicklecellanaemia.org/resources/resources/scooter30-35/scooter33.html

Further experiences of young people at school with sickle cell.
http://sicklecellanaemia.org/resources/resources/scooter30-35/scooter34.html

Summary presentation.
http://sicklecellanaemia.org/resources/resources/scooter30-35/scooter35.html

 

OER Description:

These open educational resources incorporate a series of 6 narrated presentations, presented by Professor Simon Dyson of De Montfort University. The talks explore young people’s experiences of sickle cell in schools in the UK. The OERs are available in a range of formats including PDF of the presentation slides . These resources are a ‘must’ for those involved in science and social science education, and for healthcare professionals working with young people with sickle cell.

Schools teaching resources on sickle cell released

One of the aims of the SCOOTER project is to provide high quality teaching resources on sickle cell and thalassaemia including health science and social science information. This week sees the release of two resources that provide an essential reading for schools, teachers and policy makers.

ESRC Report S Dyson

The first resource is a report of research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) on the educational experiences of young people with sickle cell disease. Researchers at De Montfort University, University of York and Loughborough University conducted surveys and interviews to understand the views and experiences of young people and from the research made recommendations to the Department of Education.

Schools Guide S Dyson

From the ESRC report the team drafted the second teaching resource which is a guide to policy written for schools. This open educational resource is free for schools to use, reuse and adapt, and within it contains definitions and guidelines to providing support and preventing illness in pupils with sickle cell and thalassaemia.

Please use these teaching resources and share them amongst your colleagues and networks. We would very much like to hear your comments on these resources and can provide them in other formats upon request.